stock clarification part I

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This one is fun to do. I started by digging through my freezer and found some old frozen carcasses of chicken, some roasted, some uncooked, I figured I’d make stock. Found some veggies in my fridge, onion, some carrots, celery, 5 cloves of garlic, I chopped these very coarsely, actually, onion only in half, carrots I broke in chunks by hand, same with the celery, garlics cut in half skins on, threw everything in my pressure cooker and added enough water to cover the chicken. 2 hours at 15psi, that took care of it.

Strained the stock and was left with a very fragrant but cloudy concoction.

1 quart (1000g) of stock needs 4 egg whited, figured this out after checking with the google machine.

This is a very old but very cool trick to filter stock and rid it from its impurities. It’s called the egg white raft, basically here’s what I did:

Got my egg whites in a bowl, my whisk, and beat the eggs until soft peaks would form, I could have used a hand mixer but didn’t have one… I know, it took forever but always nice to practice those traditional technics…

The the actual fun began. I had let the stock cool down a bit, didn’t want those egg whites setting right away. Got my immersion blender out (I know, I could have probably beaten the whites in style) poured the egg whites in, and cranked up the heat and brought the stock to about 80c while still mixing until I noticed the whites were setting and then it all happened, the egg white foam solidified, rose to the surface and left behind a wonderfully clear stock, free of impurities, golden brown in hue but without any suspended solids.

I could have followed the instructions and ladle out the liquid, but i instead strained the stock, very carefully, and even pressed down the whites in the strainer to release some of the clear stock that had been caught in them, to maximize yield. Here’s what it looked like:

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