smoked spatchcocked gochujang chicken

Another quick and easy spatchcocked chicken recipe on the grill for those of you with gas grills at home that are interested in smoking foods. I did alter a few things from my previous cook and it paid off. First, I  bought a V-shaped smoker box for my Weber grill and I got better performance out of my wood chips. They definitely smoked better. The smoke had that nice light blue hue and the amount was definitely decent. Second, I decided to smoke the chicken at 300F instead of 250F from my previous smoked chicken recipe (basic smoked spatchcocked chicken, see it here!). 

The cold-chicken cold-grill/oven dilemma. 

In both opportunities, I started with a cold grill and a cold chicken from the store. There are pros and cons with this approach from what I’ve noticed over the years.

Continue Reading

smoked chuck roast on the grill

I’ve spent the whole summer grilling outside. I got this pretty nice Webber Spirit grill about 2 months ago and I haven’t used the stove much. The grill is small, it only has 2 burners but it works really well. Gets super hot and I’ve successfully smoked a ton of different things.  I wish it were a charcoal grill but regulations in LA prohibit its use in apartment complexes.  

 I’ve owned a number of grills in the past but I rarely used them, and rather misused them. Grilling is not an easy technique, especially for a cook that’s used to sous vide cooking. Grilling provides an extremely harsh environment for food. It is extremely inaccurate in terms of heat distribution too. But being able to cook outside without setting off any smoke alarms is awesome. 

Continue Reading

Butchering lesson outcome: Part I. Roasted pork shoulder.

Butchering lesson outcome Part I. Roasted pork shoulder.

Ok, this is a couple of weeks late but happy 4th of July to America! I had an amazing time celebrating with the people I love and the food I love. If you have been following this blog, just a day before the 4th of July I attended a butchering lesson, and I was eager to cook some of the pork bounty I had earned after 8 hours of hard work, sweat and blood, literally.  Pork shoulder, slowly roasted in the oven, after a long and flavourful marinade overnight session fit the bill. 

Butchering lesson outcome Part I. Roasted pork shoulder. @ thatothercookingblog.com

When I say 8 hours of hard work, I mean 8 hours. That’s how long it takes to butcher a whole pig the traditional way although I’m sure it goes faster without annoying photographers or eagerly curious students asking a bunch of silly questions like I found myself asking. 

Continue Reading

The Best Oven Roasted Pork Shoulder I Ever Cooked

The Best Oven Roasted Pork Shoulder I've Ever Made

I chose the wrong time of the year to roast a 15 pound pork shoulder for sure. The heat wave that’s hitting southern California right now probably contributed to the amazing quality of the crackling I got. I mean, it is HOT and DRY in here!  But that didn’t stop me. I wanted to make pork tamales really bad and starting with a perfectly roasted pork shoulder is what I consider key… ok, I don’t know if that’s how most traditional recipes approach it but that’s how I make pork tamales. I’ve found many recipes suggesting  boiling the pork, which is fine, but roasting develops more flavor complexity. Guess what…. I love complexity sometimes. Sure, it will take longer, but it is SO WORTH IT. 

The Best Oven Roasted Pork Shoulder I've Ever Made @ thatothercookingblog.com by Paul Palop

This pork piece could be served as is, carved at the dinner table and you would definitely impress your dinner crowd. It looks amazing, extremely elegant! and it smells amazing as well. Whether you’re thinking of serving the roast straight or using the meat for far more ambitious applications let me break down the process of making this roast in 3 very easy steps. 

Continue Reading

Oven Roasted Pork Shoulder.

Oven Roasted Pork Shoulder.

I have posted on this same subject Oven Roasted Pork Shoulder in the past at least once (check out this pork shoulder roast post). It was one of my first posts so be kind. At the time,  I was cooking frantically then. I was reading a ton of stuff and trying to learn as quickly as possibly how to cook. It’s been a little over 4 years now. Constantly blogging about food has made the experience more rewarding. Without it it would have been well… just ok, not as fun. Oh, plus I got into the whole food photography thing which has been extremely fun and met a ton of really cool people.  Anyways, how about that roasted pork shoulder? Tonight, I watched 2 movies while this thing cooked away in the oven. Yeah, it’s that hard. The movies were The Martian… watched it twice.

Oven Roasted Pork Shoulder

Had I had the time to brine this thing I would have. But I didn’t. Well, more like I didn’t want to. I wanted it all over with by midnight. Only one way to get there this fast (I’m sure there are tons of ways but it wouldn’t sound as cool). Inject a lot of salt and garlic into the muscle with a needle. Nothing new here, but I’ve never done it. It was fun and kinda worked but will definitely need some fine tuning. Brining, marinading or dry curing is the way to go but it could take a few days with a large piece of meet like this one and let’s not get into equilibrium brining. Injecting the brine into the meat will cut down the time dramatically but it won’t be as good. Salt and time do wonderful things to meat. Reduce time, reduce awesomeness. I could do without all the awesomeness tonight seriously though. I’ve been waiting to use this bad boy (the needle that is) for a long time and tonight is the night.  Here’s what went down:

Ingredients:

4-6 boneless pork shoulder.
1 cup of water
2-3 tsp salt
2 tsp minced garlic
4 tsp honey

 

Oven Roasted Pork Shoulder

The injectable brine. Place al the ingredients in a blender and yep…. you guessed it. Blend it. On high speed for a minute or so. Get that needle ready.

Needle please. Get that pork ready. Rinse in water if necessary. Place in a pot and inject the brine into it in as many places as possible to make sure the brine reaches into the meat as much as possible. This process will take a few minutes and parental discretion is advised as well as being careful not to puncture yourself with that thing. Remember, you’re dealing with raw pork, so always a good idea to be extra careful. If time allows it, let the pork rest overnight in the fridge. In my case, I didn’t want to wait so…. Once you’re done injecting the whole brine into the pork you will realize that a lot of it is resting at the bottom of the pot. Well… speed brining isn’t perfect, toss that excess brine away. Hopefully what remains inside the meat will be enough to flavour it. I should have made my brine a little sweeter and saltier. The beauty of messing up.

 

Oven Roasted Pork Shoulder

 

Roasting. Stick the meat in the oven. I placed it in a cast iron dutch oven, but you could use a roasting pan or something similar. One thing about roasting this kind of meat is that the high content of fat makes it pretty safe to roast under a number of different conditions. It is almost guaranteed to turn out juicy and delicious. This time I roasted it on 375F for like 2 hours and then 3 more hours at 190F. The result was rosy and MEGA juicy. I don’t even wanna write about it anymore. Too delicious. And I’ve had plenty of it and don’t need any more of it today. Tomorrow is a brand new day.

 

Oven Roasted Pork Shoulder

 

Is this your favorite way of roasting pork shoulder?  let us know! We wanna keep testing different approaches all the time. cheers guys! 

 

 

The Wings of Change! Miso Glaze. Game On!

The Wings of Change! Miso Glaze. Game On!

The Wings of Change! Miso Glaze….. Never thought it would come to this but here we are, game day, chicken wings. I officially joined the other 3 trillion food blogs featuring wings today in America. Nothing wrong with that. I love those marvellous things so why not make my own wings my own way. I have to be honest. I don’t know anything about football. I plan to keep it that way too. I’m more of a soccer guy… like every 4 years for a couple of weeks and then I’m left with ZERO interest in watching sports again.  But we’re here to show off these little sticky guys not to talk about sports, so hang in there. Who won this Super Bowl? The correct answer. I don’t give a S###.

The Wings of Change! Miso Glaze. Game On!

This recipe like any other wings recipe is simplicity in itself. Wings are the fattiest part of the chicken. They only have a bit of meat and a delightful amount of awesome fatty chicken skin. They are packed with flavour and make the best finger food when prepared correctly which like I said, it’s really really simple. 

The Wings of Change! Miso Glaze. Game On!

A little bit of unofficial chicken wing anatomy. The whole wing is rarely served whole (don’t ask me why). The tips are removed since they’re mainly only bones. The drummette or drummy (my favourite) is the arm (the humerus bone is in there), which is connected to the shoulder and hence the breast. And there’s the flat or flapper. That’s the forearm. Couple of bones in there… the radius and the ulna.  I just did a massive google search to come up with all this info. I didn’t go to chicken wing school. Let’s continue.

Ingredients: (makes about 20 units of awesomeness)

The Wicked Wings:

10 whole chicken wings. Or buy 20 of your favourite parts already cut.

The Glaze:

1/2 Tbsp Garlic paste.
1 Tbsp Miso Paste (yellow or red should do)
2 Tbsp Hot sauce of your preference. I used Tapatio.
1/3 Cup brown sugar.
1/2 lime (juice only)

Garnishes:

Sesame seeds.
Cilantro leafs.
Green onion.
lime wedges.

The wings. Brine them overnight in a pot with salty water. You know, like pasta-water salty.

The Wings of Change! Miso Glaze. Game On!

This will season the wings and maybe increase the chances of adding a little extra juiciness… but anyways. You can skip this step but then you have to adjust the saltiness of the glaze. The miso paste at this point is providing the needed saltiness for this recipe. Ok, so you woke up the next days, hopefully it’s game day and now you can get going. Discard the water and dry the chicken wings with paper towels. Don’t cut them wings just yet. Less surface area, less water loss.  In a cookie sheet lined with tin foil or parchment paper (It will be easier to clean when you’re done) add the wings. I brush the tin foil with vegetable oil. I do the same with the wings.

The Wings of Change! Miso Glaze. Game On!

Everybody here needs to be super oily. If you’re making chicken wings, fat consumption shouldn’t be an issue…. Bake the wings in the oven at 450F for about 30 mins. Keep an eye on them. You can run the broiler for 5 to 10 mins or until you get the desired golden browning level of your dreams. Remove the wings from the oven. And allow to rest. Make the glaze. At this point I’m eating the wings without the glaze. They’re too awesome. Oh, you can also cut them up now, I almost forgot. Drummettes over here, flappers over there. The tips… I ate them, I won’t lie.

The Wings of Change! Miso Glaze. Game On!

The Wings of Change! Miso Glaze. Game On!

The glaze. The simplest thing. Mix all the ingredients. Over medium heat cook until a syrup forms. Don’t let anything burn. Just be patient and stir constantly. It will take about 10-15 mins. Let the color deepen as the sugar caramelizes a bit. Take your time. Don’t bother straining. If you don’t have garlic paste. You could use garlic powder or just get some exercise and work actual garlic cloves to a paste with your chef’s knife. It’s worth the practice.

The Wings of Change! Miso Glaze. Game On!

Putting it all together.  The moment of truth. Check the glaze. Make sure it’s nice and sticky but not too dry. Add water if you think it’s too thick. A little bit at times until it’s the proper consistency. Add the wings to the glaze pot and mix it all up real well. This is ready to go now. And they better be ready or you will be dismissed from your chicken wing cooking duties. Football fans don’t wait for wings once they’ve smelled them.

The Wings of Change! Miso Glaze. Game On!

Chop some cilantro and green onions, cut some lime wedges and decorate that wings platter like you mean it. Good luck out there. 1st down? who’s down? who knows. See yah!

The Wings of Change! Miso Glaze. Game On!

The Wings of Change! Miso Glaze. Game On!

 

The Simplest Roasted Chicken I Can Think of.

The Simplest Roasted Chicken

On this blog I have a bunch of chicken recipes. Two reasons. It’s delicious but it’s also tricky, right?  Anyone can overcook a chicken. I do it all the time. By proper standards the chicken above is overcooked. The only way to not overcook a chicken is to break it down and cook the different muscle groups in different plastic bags and off they go in the sous vide bath at their respective temperatures and cooking times.

Not everybody has sous vide equipment but it’s slowly becoming mainstream. I remember when I started cooking, I had to buy my first immersion circulator second hand on Ebay and it still was a lot pricier than the super cool ones they sell in stores today.

The Simplest Roasted Chicken

Not everybody has the patience for sous vide cooking. It takes a bit more planning. We live in a world that spins a little too fast constantly. Takes time learning about cooking sous vide and takes longer than traditional techniques to cook things sous vide. Probably not fish but definitely chicken and any other land animal I can think of. Ok Mr Octopus, we won’t leave you. You too take forever for a sea creature. 

The Simplest Roasted Chicken

 

The chicken in question today is the product of a few years of trying things and messing up a whole bunch of time, looking for a simpler way to roast a whole chicken. Reduce handling time to a minimum but yet end up with something delicious.  The chicken above still takes about 2 days to make but that’s mostly curing time in the fridge.  Yeah, don’t freak out, it’s not like salmonella is gonna take over your house. Just, sprinkle the chicken with a generous amount of salt, inside and outside, put the thing in an open container, place it underneath everything else in the fridge and let it be for 24-48 hours.  Yeah, you could brine it. Overrated it. I like dry curing without a lid. The skin gets dry (that’s a good thing). It will brown faster. Get crispier.

 

The cooking. No need to bother with letting the chicken get to room temperature or preheating the oven, in fact. These 2 only get in the way in my opinion. If you have been blessed with owning a cheap black cast iron pot, USE IT. Put your chicken in there. Add some vegetable oil at the bottom. Tie the legs if you want. Not a deal breaker. I did because it photographs better. Throw the pot in the oven at 400F and wait until it looks awesome. It’s about an hour and 20 mins. Run the broiler if you want extra browning. A few minutes, turn the pot around, a few more minutes and done.

The Simplest Roasted Chicken

Why would anyone start  roasting anything in a cold oven? I don’t think I have an actual explanation but it does seem to render a juicier result. One theory might be the chicken muscles have had time to acclimatize to the brutal heat in the oven and therefore less fibre tension is created from the heat-shock which is the main cause of water loss. If you worry about bacteria, you shouldn’t with this approach. The oven will reach 212F and kill everything on the surface within minutes. You can also blanch the chicken in boiling water for a minute before roasting but that would be a lot of extra work. Trust me, your oven will destroy any living thing that goes in there in a matter of a few minutes.

The Simplest Roasted Chicken

And that’s it. Chicken, salt and an oven.

The Simplest Roasted Chicken

 

Without any babysitting you can end up with a fantastic result in the end now imagine what you could end up with if you actually babysat (?) this thing. I would love it if you could tell me about it. Ok chicken fans, Im out. Start looking into sous vide equipment too. You won’t regret it. My understanding of cooking changed the moment I used one forever.

 

 

 

 

 

Carne Mechada! Celebrating Venezuela and the winds of change!

I’m sure not most of you out there know about what’s happening in Venezuela. I keep my blog politics free. I’ll make an exception tonight. I will admit that I am EXTREMELY happy with the outcome of the last national assembly elections back home. I hope the 2 parties (winners and losers) figure out a way of working together to get this country out of the sink hole it currently is in.

A little context. The current economic and social crisis in the country has transformed Venezuela into one of the most violent places on the planet (sometimes more dangerous than countries that are at war). If you care to know, it also has the highest inflation rate of all the countries in the world today. This wasn’t the case 16 years ago. I hope good things are in store for the future of this beautiful country. I’m gonna celebrate it with a simple recipe that I love making and I definitely love eating. Carne Mechada!

Continue Reading

Meat and Potatoes. Sous vide brisket. Baby creamer potatoes. Baby kale Salad.

Meat and Potatoes. Sous vide brisket. Baby creamer potatoes. Baby kale Salad @ thatothercookingblog.com

9:07 PM. For whatever reason today I remembered the worst accidents I’ve had in my kitchen in the last 4 years. I don’t want to forget them I guess. They taught me a lot. I can recall at least 4 relevant ones:

Three stitches on my left forearm. Cleaning dishes. Plate slipped from my soapy hands. My reflex was to catch it. I crushed it against the sink with my hand. One of the shards punctured my arm. Blood everywhere. Drove myself to the ER. 3 hours of waiting. They finally patched me up. Cost me over a thousand dollars of copay. That’s insurance. God bless America.

Chef knife puncture on my left leg shin. Washing dishes. Again.. now you know why I hate it so much. Dropped knife. Jumped back to distance myself from it. I didn’t want it going through my shoe. Didn’t jump back far enough. Knife lands on its butt. I land on the knife tip. Bone stops knife from going deeper. Blood everywhere. Literally. This time,  f#$% ER. I patch myself up.

Second degree burn. Maybe third. Pots have been in the oven for 3 hours at 500F. I’m not roasting anything. I’m drying silica gel crystals. I like keeping my closest dry. Take the pots out of the oven. Turn around. Get distracted doing some cleaning. Turn back. Hold and lift the heavy pot from the counter. My own skin sizzles now. Put down the pots on the counter. Feel on of my hand nerves go numb. Stick my hand in cold running water. Reach for some ice in the freezer while my hand still submerged in cold water. Add some ice. Pain is intolerable outside the water. I was stuck there for a good hour until the pain was manageable. Cover my hand in vaseline. Walked to the pharmacy. Couldn’t drive. Buy some stuff. Patch myself up. Take some iPhone pics of my mummy hand. F#$% ER.

Kitchen fire. Deep-frying. Over the stove. Pot has too much oil. I don’t remember what I’m making then but pot overflows. Within a second. Fire everywhere. I’m ok with fire. I’m not ok with the amount of black smoke that fills my apartment in a second. All smoke alarms go off. The bottom of all my white cabinet, are now black. I take the burning pot to the sink and throw on the lid. Fire’s out now. My kitchen is a disaster. Spend hours trying to clean this mess.

rel=”attachment wp-att-6637″>Meat and Potatoes. Sous vide brisket. Baby creamer potatoes. Baby kale Salad @ thatothercookingblog.com

Today nothing like this happened. Actually it has been a couple of years since my last kitchen accident and I hope that stays that way for all of eternity. I’m very careful nowadays when I do dishes. I have a proper deep fryer and I definitely grab all metallic pots and pans with a dry towel no matter what.

Meat and Potatoes. Sous vide brisket. Baby creamer potatoes. Baby kale Salad @ thatothercookingblog.com

Today is meat and potato day for me. After the sous vide brisket success I decided to make a simple lunch and enjoy it accompanied with some of my favorite things. Potatoes and Kale. I was also very short on time, so I kept it super basic. Pressure cooked baby creamer potatoes in about half an inch of really salty water. And made a quick kale salad with almond oil and rice vinegar. For the potatoes. Don’t peel them. And cook for about 8 mins after the pressure cooker has reached 15 psi. Allow them to rest. Don’t serve them right away or they will dry out (they steam all the water off). Let them rest in the pressure cooker vessel for about 10 mins.

Meat and Potatoes. Sous vide brisket. Baby creamer potatoes. Baby kale Salad @ thatothercookingblog.com

I’m signing off now. Good night!

 

 

Beef Brisket Sous Vide. 48h Marinade. 32h 57C

Beef Brisket Sous Vide

Cooking beef brisket is big deal in the US. A really big deal actually. There are competitions and stuff. Everybody gathers with their families, and their smokers and their secret dry rub recipes and whatnots and spend beautiful summer days on football fields cooking delicious meat that resemble works of art. It’s amazing stuff really. Maybe this beef brisket madness extends to other countries in the world, I honestly don’t know.

Beef Brisket Sous Vide

What I do know is that you can make a heavenly good one at home. I don’t have a smoker, and until I get one, my brisket recipes will rely on either liquid smoke or no smokey flavour period. It’s ok.  I will eventually get one. But not tonight. Tonight I will just write about the extremely happy accident that this was. 

Ingredients (makes about 6 servings. Time: about 4 days mostly idle):

3 pound beef brisket
2 Tbsp Hoisin sauce
2 Tbsp Fish sauce
2 Tbsp Kosher salt
2 Tbsp Minced garlic
2 Cups Mirin wine

Beef Brisket Sous Vide

This carnivore sous vide recipe, just like most could be summarized in 3 sentences.

1. Combine all the ingredients in a plastic container shake well and allow to rest in your fridge for 48 hours undisturbed.
2. Discard marinade and add the brisket to a plastic ziplock bag with some vegetable oil, remove all the air and cook at 57C for 32 hours.
3. Remove brisket from the baggie and sear on all side on a really hot skillet or deep fry at 375F for 2 minutes like I did.

 

Beef Brisket Sous Vide

 

Beef Brisket Sous Vide

 

Beef Brisket Sous Vide

 

Beef Brisket Sous Vide

that’s all I got. Enjoy.